Monthly Archives: November 2013

A Grown Up Kind Of Pretty by Joshilyn Jackson – Book

Grown Up

This book, A Grown Up Kind of Pretty by Joshilyn Jackson, is the first Joshilyn Jackson book I have read, but it won’t be the last. She writes in a Southern voice, but not a saccharine Southern voice. The way these three women, Jackson’s main characters, speak is full of color and of speech patterns unique to their various ages. Big (Ginny), is the matriarch, a girl child who grew up quickly when she got pregnant at fifteen and found herself alone with her child, Little (Liza). Big does not mince words, she has a bone to pick with the Baptists and she is fiercely protective of her daughter, who, when we meet Liza, is recovering from a stroke which she was too young and healthy to have had.

In spite of her mom’s warnings, out of a certain wild and spontaneous nature, and adult perversions beyond her control, Liza, who is very attractive to men, also finds herself pregnant at fifteen and runs away from home soon after. I told you this is a Southern story, but it is also a universal story. Liza arrives home two years later with her child Mosey in tow and an addiction to prescription drugs which she developed when she was trying to quit a meth addiction. We learn Liza’s life in flashbacks as each character in this story gets a chance to reveal her singular voice and tell her side of the tale in chapters that alternate among the three characters. We pick up the story in the year when Mosey turns fifteen (the curse year) and as we do we are presented with a mystery. There are family secrets which must be unraveled from an eyewitness (Liza), who is currently unable to speak. These secrets are killer, but not in the sense that turns this into an actual murder mystery, in a sense that reveals to us once again the sometimes venal nature of people who hide under proper exteriors.

The pace of the book is very fast and these women do not dwell on sorrow, but rather on truth, love, honest anger, and a certain feisty approach to life. I enjoyed Joshilyn Jackson’s book immensely. I especially appreciated the author’s ability to portray heavy matters lightly, but without making these matters seem unimportant.

A Grown Up Kind Of Pretty by Joshilyn Jackson – Book

 
 
This book, A Grown Up Kind of Pretty by Joshilyn Jackson, is the first Joshilyn Jackson book I have read, but it won’t be the last. She writes in a Southern voice, but not a saccharine Southern voice. The way these three women, Jackson’s main characters, speak is full of color and of speech patterns unique to their various ages. Big (Ginny), is the matriarch, a girl child who grew up quickly when she got pregnant at fifteen and found herself alone with her child, Little (Liza). Big does not mince words, she has a bone to pick with the Baptists and she is fiercely protective of her daughter, who, when we meet Liza, is recovering from a stroke which she was too young and healthy to have had.

In spite of her mom’s warnings, out of a certain wild and spontaneous nature, and adult perversions beyond her control, Liza, who is very attractive to men, also finds herself pregnant at fifteen and runs away from home soon after. I told you this is a Southern story, but it is also a universal story. Liza arrives home two years later with her child Mosey in tow and an addiction to prescription drugs which she developed when she was trying to quit a meth addiction. We learn Liza’s life in flashbacks as each character in this story gets a chance to reveal her singular voice and tell her side of the tale in chapters that alternate among the three characters. We pick up the story in the year when Mosey turns fifteen (the curse year) and as we do we are presented with a mystery. There are family secrets which must be unraveled from an eyewitness (Liza), who is currently unable to speak. These secrets are killer, but not in the sense that turns this into an actual murder mystery, in a sense that reveals to us once again the sometimes venal nature of people who hide under proper exteriors.

The pace of the book is very fast and these women do not dwell on sorrow, but rather on truth, love, honest anger, and a certain feisty approach to life. I enjoyed Joshilyn Jackson’s book immensely. I especially appreciated the author’s ability to portray heavy matters lightly, but without making these matters seem unimportant.

Coffee Table Books 2, 2013 – The Amazon List

coffee table3

 

Coffee Table Books That Sold Well in 2013 – Amazon

 

Humans of New York by Brandon Stanton

Art That Changed the World by DK

Meggs History of Graphic Design by Philip Meggs and Alston W. Purvis

Dancers Among Us: A Celebration of Joy in the Everyday by Jordan Matter

Le Livre Blanc (cookbook) (not home cooking) by Anne-Sophie Pic

An Illustrated Life: Drawing Inspiration from the Private Sketchbooks of Danny Gregory “Artists, Illustrators, and Designers

Journeys of a Lifetime: 500 of the World’s Greatest Trips by National Geographic (2007)

Post Secret: Extraordinary Confession from Everyday Lives by Frank Warren (2005)

Underwater Dogs by Seth Casteel (2012)

National Geographic Simply Beautiful Photographs by Annie Griffiths (2010)

If…(Question For the Game of Life) by Evelyn Mcfarlane and James Saywell (2007)

Chanel: Collections & Creations by Daniele Bott (2007)

World’s Best Travel Experiences: 400 Extraordinary Places by National Geographic and Andrew McCarthy

Dogs by Lewis Blackwell and Tim Flach

Ansel Adams: 400 Photographs by Ansel Adams and Andrea Stillman (2007)

The Most Scenic Drives in America, Newly Revised and Updated: 120 Spectacular Road Trips by Editors of Reader’s Digest (2012)

Fashion: 150 Years of Couturiers, Designers, Labels by Charlotte Seeling (2012)

National Geographic 125 Years: Legendary Photographs, Adventures, and Discoveries That Changed the World by Mark Collins Jenkins (2012)

Lost Balls: Great Holes, Tough Shots, and Bad Lies by Charles Lindsay (2005)

New York: Portrait of a City by Revel Golden (2010)

Vogue Living: Houses, Gardens, People by Hamish Bowles and Calvin Klein (2007)

The Art Book: New Edition by Editors of Phaidon (2012)

The Pioneer Woman Cooks: Food From My Frontier by Ree Drummond (2012)

The Things that Matter by Nate Berkus (2012)

Visions of Earth: National Geographic Photographs of Beauty, Majesty, and Wonder (National Geographic Collectors) by National Geographic (2013)

Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty (Metropolitan Museum of Art) by Andrew Bolton, Solve Sundsbo, Tim Blanks, Susannah Frankel (2011)

Great Houses of the South by Laurie Ossman and Steven Brooke (2010)

Kate Spade New York: Things We Love: 20 Years of Inspiration, Intriguing Bits and Other Curiosities by Kate Spade New York and Deborah Lloyd (2013)

Maddie on Things: A Super Serious Project about Dogs and Physics by Theron Humphrey (2013)

Vogue: The Lovers by Dodie Kazanjian and Hamish Bowles (2011)

Chanel: The Vocabulary of Style by Jerome Gautier (2011)

Lonely Planet Travel Book by Lonely Planet (2011)

More Than Human by Lewis Blackwell and Tim Flach (2011)

Stoner Coffee Table Book by Steve Mockus (2011)

Paris: Portrait of a City by Jean-Claude Gautrand  (2012)

Fifty Places to Play Golf Before You Die: Golf Experts Share the World’s Greatest Destinations by Chris Santella (2012)

Life in Color: National Geographic Photographs by Susan Hitchcock, Annie Griffiths, Jonathan Adler (2012)

Ships of the Line (Star Trek) by Margaret Clark and Doug Drexler (2006)

Vintage coffee table books also make great gifts. Here are two links:

https://www.onekingslane.com/vintage-market-finds/books?&Wt.srch=1&utm_source=google&utm_medium=search%7Cvmf&utm_term=vintage%20coffee%20table%20books|e&utm_content=vmf_books_coffee_table_exact|gsvmf|mkwid|swsmFzkbG_dc|pcrid|25385815702&utm_campaign=VMF_Search_General_RFSA_NonMembers

http://www.ebay.com/cln/nicolettemasonblog/Coffee-Table-Books/58209109016

 

 

 

 

 

Coffee Table Books 2, 2013 – The Amazon List

Coffee Table Books That Sold Well in 2013 – Amazon

Humans of New York by Brandon Stanton

Art That Changed the World by DK

Meggs History of Graphic Design by Philip Meggs and Alston W. Purvis

Dancers Among Us: A Celebration of Joy in the Everyday by Jordan Matter

Le Livre Blanc (cookbook) (not home cooking) by Anne-Sophie Pic

An Illustrated Life: Drawing Inspiration from the Private Sketchbooks of Danny Gregory “Artists, Illustrators, and Designers

Journeys of a Lifetime: 500 of the World’s Greatest Trips by National Geographic (2007)

Post Secret: Extraordinary Confession from Everyday Lives by Frank Warren (2005)

Underwater Dogsby Seth Casteel (2012)

National Geographic Simply Beautiful Photographs by Annie Griffiths (2010)

If…(Question For the Game of Life) by Evelyn Mcfarlane and James Saywell (2007)

Chanel: Collections & Creations by Daniele Bott (2007)

World’s Best Travel Experiences: 400 Extraordinary Places by National Geographic and Andrew McCarthy

Dogs by Lewis Blackwell and Tim Flach

Ansel Adams: 400 Photographs by Ansel Adams and Andrea Stillman (2007)

The Most Scenic Drives in America, Newly Revised and Updated: 120 Spectacular Road Trips by Editors of Reader’s Digest (2012)

Fashion: 150 Years of Couturiers, Designers, Labels by Charlotte Seeling (2012)

National Geographic 125 Years: Legendary Photographs, Adventures, and Discoveries That Changed the World by Mark Collins Jenkins (2012)

Lost Balls: Great Holes, Tough Shots, and Bad Lies by Charles Lindsay (2005)

New York: Portrait of a City by Revel Golden (2010)

Vogue Living: Houses, Gardens, People by Hamish Bowles and Calvin Klein (2007)

The Art Book: New Edition by Editors of Phaidon (2012)

The Pioneer Woman Cooks: Food From My Frontier by Ree Drummond (2012)

The Things that Matter by Nate Berkus (2012)

Visions of Earth: National Geographic Photographs of Beauty, Majesty, and Wonder (National Geographic Collectors) by National Geographic (2013)

Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty (Metropolitan Museum of Art) by Andrew Bolton, Solve Sundsbo, Tim Blanks, Susannah Frankel (2011)

Great Houses of the South by Laurie Ossman and Steven Brooke (2010)

Kate Spade New York: Things We Love: 20 Years of Inspiration, Intriguing Bits and Other Curiosities by Kate Spade New York and Deborah Lloyd (2013)

Maddie on Things: A Super Serious Project about Dogs and Physics by Theron Humphrey (2013)

Vogue: The Lovers by Dodie Kazanjian and Hamish Bowles (2011)

Chanel: The Vocabulary of Style by Jerome Gautier (2011)

Lonely Planet Travel Book by Lonely Planet (2011)

More Than Human by Lewis Blackwell and Tim Flach (2011)

Stoner Coffee Table Book by Steve Mockus (2011)

Paris: Portrait of a City by Jean-Claude Gautrand  (2012)

Fifty Places to Play Golf Before You Die: Golf Experts Share the World’s Greatest Destinations by Chris Santella (2012)

Life in Color: National Geographic Photographs by Susan Hitchcock, Annie Griffiths, Jonathan Adler (2012)

 

 

 

 

 

Thankfulness and John Lennon

givepeaceachance5

 

I came of age in those amazing times when America learned to hate war and long for peace. I grew up chanting “All we are saying, is give Peace a chance” along with John Lennon and many blue jean clad peers. We all boarded the “Peace Train” and pinned our hopes on a world that wanted peace as badly as we did. We recognized war as a terrible thing, tearing people, families, children, homes, villages, cities, and nations apart and emphasizing the fault lines of hate that run through human history. We did not want to go to war in Vietnam.

As we aged our anti-war message mellowed. We learned the lessons of expediency.  With Katie we watched two planes fly into the Twin Towers; we watched those proud towers which pierced our skies burn to ash, melt, and fall over our iconic city. While many of us peaceniks did not want to go to war in Iraq and had real doubts about those weapons of mass destruction, we felt that if we seemed unprepared for some military style of retaliation we would only invite more attacks. We recognized the need to mount a good defense in terms of domestic security systems, and a good offense in terms of a willingness to find and hunt down our enemies and to be ready to meet them on a battlefield. War reared its ugly head again and our chorus of “give Peace a chance” dwindled until it was almost just a silent wish. But that refrain is still there; it is the bass line of our existence. When our strong yearning for peace was met by the revelation that anti-American sentiment around the world was about to become the treble line of our existence, we girded our loins (well the loins of our soldiers) to do more war, war seemingly without end, as it is unclear how all the hostilities that face us around the globe will ever give way to tolerance and peaceful coexistence. It looks as if our contretemps with Islamic extremists will be quite hard to unravel, and then we face other unhappy campers in far flung corners of the world. It looks like we will become way more weary of war before the people of earth will ever reach some kind of equanimity and détente.

So when I saw what happened with the chemical weapons in Syria; when I saw that a peaceful solution was found that seems to be functioning; when I see Syria’s chemical weapons being destroyed by Syria without our having to brings our missiles to bear, then it does not matter who looks weak and who did or didn’t get to strut their hawkishness. I am simply thankful and since it is Thanksgiving, what better week is there to express my thankfulness. And when I see Iran asking us to consider a bargain, a deal, however small that deal may be, I am again thankful, although with lots of reservations – a kind of wait and see thankfulness that that little bass line, John Lennon’s line, “give Peace a chance” just got a little bit louder; not rocking the car louder, but the car next to you knows you are listening to the tune louder. I guess you could say that I am tentatively thankful, hoping this will turn into full blown thankfulness and that this trend of working things out will continue. Happy Thanksgiving! Listen to the bass line.

and Imagine…

givepeaceachance4

 

This is the view from the cheap seats.

This blog post is also available at http://thebrissioniblog.blogspot.com/

 

Thankfulness and John Lennon

I came of age in those amazing times when America learned to hate war and long for peace. I grew up chanting “All we are saying, is give Peace a chance” along with John Lennon and many blue jean clad peers. We all boarded the “Peace Train” and pinned our hopes on a world that wanted peace as badly as we did. We recognized war as a terrible thing, tearing people, families, children, homes, villages, cities, and nations apart and emphasizing the fault lines of hate that run through human history. We did not want to go to war in Vietnam.

As we aged our anti-war message mellowed. We learned the lessons of expediency.  With Katie we watched two planes fly into the Twin Towers; we watched those proud towers which pierced our skies burn to ash, melt, and fall over our iconic city. While many of us peaceniks did not want to go to war in Iraq and had real doubts about those weapons of mass destruction, we felt that if we seemed unprepared for some military style of retaliation we would only invite more attacks. We recognized the need to mount a good defense in terms of domestic security systems, and a good offense in terms of a willingness to find and hunt down our enemies and to be ready to meet them on a battlefield. War reared its ugly head again and our chorus of “give Peace a chance” dwindled until it was almost just a silent wish. But that refrain is still there; it is the bass line of our existence. When our strong yearning for peace was met by the revelation that anti-American sentiment around the world was about to become the treble line of our existence, we girded our loins (well the loins of our soldiers) to do more war, war seemingly without end, as it is unclear how all the hostilities that face us around the globe will ever give way to tolerance and peaceful coexistence. It looks as if our contretemps with Islamic extremists will be quite hard to unravel, and then we face other unhappy campers in far flung corners of the world. It looks like we will become way more weary of war before the people of earth will ever reach some kind of equanimity and détente.

So when I saw what happened with the chemical weapons in Syria; when I saw that a peaceful solution was found that seems to be functioning; when I see Syria’s chemical weapons being destroyed by Syria without our having to brings our missiles to bear, then it does not matter who looks weak and who did or didn’t get to strut their hawkishness. I am simply thankful and since it is Thanksgiving, what better week is there to express my thankfulness. And when I see Iran asking us to consider a bargain, a deal, however small that deal may be, I am again thankful, although with lots of reservations – a kind of wait and see thankfulness that that little bass line, John Lennon’s line, “give Peace a chance” just got a little bit louder; not rocking the car louder, but the car next to you knows you are listening to the tune louder. I guess you could say that I am tentatively thankful, hoping this will turn into full blown thankfulness and that this trend of working things out will continue. Happy Thanksgiving! Listen to the bass line.
 and Imagine…
 
 
 
This is the view from the cheap seats.
This blog post is also available at www.brissioni.com

 

 

Join Me in My Boycott

boycott

 

Sadly, this Christmas, I have to boycott some of my favorite places. If I want pretty or delicious things, if I am going for aesthetics, these places are not where I usually end up. For decorating and gifts I go to Pottery Barn and catalogues, Marshalls and T J Maxx, our local greenhouses operated by Chuck Hafner which has all my gardening supplies and the piney things I love to hang at Christmas time. The places I have to boycott right now are my convenience favorites. Walmart won’t pay its associates a living wage, so I have to boycott Walmart this Christmas. I go to Walmart when I run out of all my OTC meds at once or when I need a gift of toys for one of the children in the family (toys which I will have to find elsewhere this Christmas), or when I want to add to my winter jigsaw puzzle supply.

Boycotting McDonalds will leave a small hole in my life. McDonalds is my source of the occasional quick lunch; my choice, filet o’ fish and diet cola. I have a 96 year old mom and I occasionally buy her a milk shake, which I would do more often except that she insists on paying me back. I lie and say it was on the dollar menu but after brazenly staring down her suspicious mind (she’s turning me into a good liar), then she must dig around in her purse to find four quarters for me before she can enjoy her milkshake. I guess I will have to get her milkshakes at Burger King for a while, but I will have to tell a new whopper when I claim that these milkshakes are on the dollar menu at Burger King also. Does Burger King even have a dollar menu? So boycotting McDonalds is forcing me to sin.

Hobby Lobby is the third place I love that I cannot enjoy because they said some anti-Semitic something and because they will not pay for employees’ contraception through their health insurance; in other words, in some way they have embraced an unacceptable intolerance. Hobby Lobby was my source for decorating doodads like inexpensive fake flowers, frames and mats and posters, cutsy hooks to put on wall and doors to help organize things that look good when hung in plain view.

So, to sum up, Walmart and McDonalds both refuse to pay their employees a living wage and that is why I have to boycott them. I understand that it would not even be a boycott if I didn’t have to give something up in order to make my point. Hobby Lobby I have to boycott because they disrespected someone’s human rights. Actually all three of these places of business have disrespected people’s human rights.

Obviously, one little person, me, refusing to shop at these businesses will have little, if any effect, but if we all boycott these people so that they have to shape up quickly and do what is right, then I will be able to resume my guilty pleasures, including telling tiny lies to my mom. I am sorry that this seems to make this whole situation all about me, which from my point of view it is, but, I promise there will be collateral benefits for all if we win through sacrifice. Christmas time is a very effective time to hold a boycott. So, for a while, stop buying at Walmart, McDonalds and Hobby Lobby.

Join Me in My Boycott


Sadly, this Christmas, I have to boycott some of my favorite places. If I want pretty or delicious things, if I am going for aesthetics, these places are not where I usually end up. For decorating and gifts I go to Pottery Barn and catalogues, Marshalls and T J Maxx, our local greenhouses operated by Chuck Hafner which has all my gardening supplies and the piney things I love to hang at Christmas time. The places I have to boycott right now are my convenience favorites. Walmart won’t pay its associates a living wage, so I have to boycott Walmart this Christmas. I go to Walmart when I run out of all my OTC meds at once or when I need a gift of toys for one of the children in the family (toys which I will have to find elsewhere this Christmas), or when I want to add to my winter jigsaw puzzle supply.

Boycotting McDonalds will leave a small hole in my life. McDonalds is my source of the occasional quick lunch; my choice, filet o’ fish and diet cola. I have a 96 year old mom and I occasionally buy her a milk shake, which I would do more often except that she insists on paying me back. I lie and say it was on the dollar menu but after brazenly staring down her suspicious mind (she’s turning me into a good liar), then she must dig around in her purse to find four quarters for me before she can enjoy her milkshake. I guess I will have to get her milkshakes at Burger King for a while, but I will have to tell a new whopper when I claim that these milkshakes are on the dollar menu at Burger King also. Does Burger King even have a dollar menu? So boycotting McDonalds is forcing me to sin.

Hobby Lobby is the third place I love that I cannot enjoy because they said some anti-Semitic something and because they will not pay for employees’ contraception through their health insurance; in other words, in some way they have embraced an unacceptable intolerance. Hobby Lobby was my source for decorating doodads like inexpensive fake flowers, frames and mats and posters, cutsy hooks to put on wall and doors to help organize things that look good when hung in plain view.

So, to sum up, Walmart and McDonalds both refuse to pay their employees a living wage and that is why I have to boycott them. I understand that it would not even be a boycott if I didn’t have to give something up in order to make my point. Hobby Lobby I have to boycott because they disrespected someone’s human rights. Actually all three of these places of business have disrespected people’s human rights.

Obviously, one little person, me, refusing to shop at these businesses will have little, if any effect, but if we all boycott these people so that they have to shape up quickly and do what is right, then I will be able to resume my guilty pleasures, including telling tiny lies to my mom. I am sorry that this seems to make this whole situation all about me, which from my point of view it is, but, I promise there will be collateral benefits for all if we win through sacrifice. Christmas time is a very effective time to hold a boycott. So, for a while, stop buying at Walmart, McDonalds and Hobby Lobby. While it might seem harsh to single out these businesses their experiences will serve as examples to others.   

I’m Very Disappointed With Dan Maffei

Dan Maffei

Dan Maffei is the Representative to the US House of Representatives from the 24th District in New York State which means that, among thousands of others, he represents me. He seems like a perfectly nice person and he has a master’s degree and a doctorate from prestigious universities (his doctorate is from Harvard). He comes off as a little mopey and slow-witted, perhaps because he is somewhat shy in a world of schmoozers.

He won his first term in 2008 and the local papers criticized him mightily and frequently for voting with the Democrats every time. Of course, he was, and is, a Democrat, but the editors and those locals who write letters to the editor implied he was a rubber stamp party patsy with no mind of his own. In 2010 Dan Maffei lost his seat in the House and Anne Marie Buerkle was elected, someone we hardly knew, who turned out to be a Tea Partier Republican who made no pretense of fair governance. She had her own axe to grind and she toed the Republican Party line. Maffei looked almost like his own man compared to the two year digression and waste of time that was Anne Marie Buerkle.

When Mr. Maffei ran again in 2012 against Anne Marie Buerkle, I wasn’t excited but I was very relieved to help elect a Democrat again. I even went to the airport and waited in a long line to attend the photo op and speech when Bill Clinton flew into Syracuse to endorse Dan Maffei (see my blog post, Oh, Oh I’m Becoming a Groupie from Oct. 20, 2012 at http://thebrissioniblog.blogspot.com/).

Dan Maffei3

I understand that Mr. Maffei did not want to give the local paper, or those who wrote all those letters to the editor, a chance to say that he was just a Democratic clone or zombie with no mind of his own, but he should have used that expensively educated brain of his to realize that voting with Republicans during the government shutdown to end Obamacare forever, and his second vote with Republicans to change Obamacare so drastically that it would actually no longer be Obamacare, were not the two times he should have decided to strike out on his own and show that he could vote against his party.

Dan Maffei has had two chances to show us that he understands what the people in his constituency want and need. He has no talent for this in spite of the time he served with Daniel Patrick Moynihan. Who will we elect if we don’t want Dan Maffei, and given that we certainly don’t want Anne Marie Buerkle? Who can we get who will be a brilliant Democrat and a quietly dynamic representative to the House in 2014? Would Sam Roberts be a good choice, or perhaps Dave Valesky (is he from this district)? Surely we can find someone who doesn’t just behave like, pardon the expression, a tool.
This is the view from the cheap seats.

 

I’m Very Disappointed with Dan Maffei

 
Dan Maffei is the Representative to the US House of Representatives from the 24th District in New York State which means that, among thousands of others, he represents me. He seems like a perfectly nice person and he has a master’s degree and a doctorate from prestigious universities (his doctorate is from Harvard). He comes off as a little mopey and slow-witted, perhaps because he is somewhat shy in a world of schmoozers.

He won his first term in 2008 and the local papers criticized him mightily and frequently for voting with the Democrats every time. Of course, he was, and is, a Democrat, but the editors and those locals who write letters to the editor implied he was a rubber stamp party patsy with no mind of his own. In 2010 Dan Maffei lost his seat in the House and Anne Marie Buerkle was elected, someone we hardly knew, who turned out to be a Tea Partier Republican who made no pretense of fair governance. She had her own axe to grind and she toed the Republican Party line. Maffei looked almost like his own man compared to the two year digression and waste of time that was Anne Marie Buerkle.

 
When Mr. Maffei ran again in 2012 against Anne Marie Buerkle, I wasn’t excited but I was very relieved to help elect a Democrat again. I even went to the airport and waited in a long line to attend the photo op and speech when Bill Clinton flew into Syracuse to endorse Dan Maffei (see my blog post, Oh, Oh I’m Becoming a Groupie from Oct. 20, 2012).

I understand that Mr. Maffei did not want to give the local paper, or those who wrote all those letters to the editor, a chance to say that he was just a Democratic clone or zombie with no mind of his own, but he should have used that expensively educated brain of his to realize that voting with Republicans during the government shutdown to end Obamacare forever, and his second vote with Republicans to change Obamacare so drastically that it would actually no longer be Obamacare, were not the two times he should have decided to strike out on his own and show that he could vote against his party.

Dan Maffei has had two chances to show us that he understands what the people in his constituency want and need. He has no talent for this in spite of the time he served with Daniel Patrick Moynihan. Who will we elect if we don’t want Dan Maffei, and given that we certainly don’t want Anne Marie Buerkle? Who can we get who will be a brilliant Democrat and a quietly dynamic representative to the House in 2014? Would Sam Roberts be a good choice, or perhaps Dave Valesky (is he from this district)? Surely we can find someone who doesn’t just behave like, pardon the expression, a tool.
 
This is the view from the cheap seats.
This blog post is also available at www.brissioni.com